News

Thursday, February 28, 2019

BY ROB BONTA SPECIAL TO THE SACRAMENTO BEE

FEBRUARY 28, 2019 11:16 AM

Around 30 million Americans, including nearly four million Californians, are affected by rare diseases. According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders, there are more than 7,000 of these conditions. Around half of rare disease patients are children.

If you know a family facing a rare disease, you’ve seen what they go through. Fighting one of these conditions is like having a second full-time job with the sole purpose of keeping a loved one alive. It often starts with a diagnostic odyssey, during which no one can figure out why their child is sick. This can go on for months or years...

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

The San Francisco Chronicle

By Amber Maltbie and Rob Bonta

The November elections delivered a strong message that a new generation of female leaders is ready and motivated to seek elected office. Women will make up 30 percent of the incoming California Legislature. While that’s a significant improvement from the 23 percent representation just a few months ago, and it is mirrored at the city level, where California women hold 31 percent of elected seats, it is still well below gender parity.

In California’s 10 largest cities, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and San Francisco Mayor London Breed are the only female mayors.

There are many ways to help bring about more parity. One solution would allow candidates to use campaign funds for child care.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

In January, a new state law goes into effect that requires all public schools to provide human trafficking prevention education to students at least once in middle school and once in high school.

“The whole idea was let’s look at teachers as first responders in the classroom,” said Ashlie Bryant, president and co-founder of 3Strands Global Foundation, a coalition of nonprofits that created the curriculum and sponsored the Human Trafficking Prevention Education and Training Act. Assemblymen Rob Bonta, D-Oakland, and Evan Low, D-San Jose, authored the bill.

“The goal is not only to identify students who are actively being trafficked, but also to reduce the number of students who could become victims, buyers or traffickers,” Bonta said.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

By Sudhin Thanawala | AP October 25 at 12:25 AM

SAN FRANCISCO — Efforts to do away with cash bail in California received a big boost when the state’s top judge got behind a proposal to end what critics say is a system that keeps poor people behind bars while wealthier suspects can pay for their freedom.

California Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye said Tuesday that instead of cash bail, the state should rely on assessments of defendants’ danger to the public to determine whether they should be released.

The proposal endorsed by Cantil-Sakauye is contained in a report by a group of judges that concluded the state’s cash bail system “unnecessarily compromises victim and public safety” and “exacerbates socioeconomic disparities and racial bias.”

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

“The Governor made us wait,” said Representative Rob Bonta of the California Assembly, about the Buy Clean California act that he had sponsored.

Governor Jerry Brown had until midnight on Sunday to sign or veto the bill. "It was touch-and-go until the very end, given some of the governor’s office's concerns," Bonta reports. He was on a plane returning home from visiting his daughter on the east coast when the good news finally arrived in the form of a group text from his staff:  AB 262 signed!!

“I congratulated my team,” Bonta said. “This was not an easy lift at all.”

Friday, September 29, 2017

Capital & Main
Author: Dean Kuipers

With California doubling and tripling down on climate change as a reality in 2017, a new bill awaiting Governor Jerry Brown’s signature could use the state’s massive purchasing power as the world’s sixth largest economy to address greenhouse gas emissions far beyond its borders.

Assembly Bill 262, the Buy Clean Act, would require all state departments and the University of California and California State University systems to buy steel, rebar, flat glass and mineral wool board insulation for its infrastructure projects from low-carbon producers. Currently, the state usually buys at the lowest price, meaning that materials can come from companies in China and elsewhere, where the carbon footprint is almost certainly higher.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

BY HAL HARVEY

AND ROB BONTA

Special to The Bee

SEPTEMBER 12, 2017 12:00 PM

California has long been a global leader on climate change and energy innovation. Since the passage of the Global Warming Solutions Act a decade ago, other countries have sought to emulate our cutting-edge approach to reducing carbon emissions.

Now, with the Buy Clean California Act, the state has an opportunity to export that leadership directly, through an innovative new approach to industrial pollution.