News

Saturday, October 5, 2013

In his book “America is in the Heart: A Personal History,” the great Filipino-American writer Carlos Bulosan wrote about the dire straits of Filipino farm workers like himself in the United States. “I came to know afterward that in many ways, it was a crime to be a Filipino in California,” Bulosan wrote. “It was the year of the great hatred: the lives of Filipinos were cheaper than those of dogs.”

Between 1910 and 1930, wave upon wave of young Filipino men came to America and found work mostly in its fields and canneries. In California they labored to help tame and develop the land, but their heroic efforts are barely acknowledged in recollections of the state’s history. But a significant step has recently been taken: The important role of Filipino-Americans in California’s labor history will now be taught in school.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

OAKLAND -- Those most in need of financial advice are often the ones who can least afford it, but on Saturday, the city will bring financial planning to the people here.

Oakland Financial Planning Day is a day-long event backed by nonprofits and elected officials that offers free financial advice to anyone who walks through the door -- no sales pitches, no fine print and no strings attached. Organized by the Financial Planning Association of the East Bay, the event gives the public a chance to meet one-on-one with up to 50 certified financial planners to discuss how to get out of debt, save for college, buy a house, recover from a foreclosure, prepare for retirement or start a business.

Thursday, September 26, 2013

MANILA, Philippines – Despite being home to the largest Filipino American population in the US, California never had a Filipino American legislator. Until now.

Quezon City-born Rob Bonta, 41, was elected into Assembly – as the representative for California’s 18th Assembly District – in 2012.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

A “harm reduction” approach to public health, rather than an abstinence or look-the-other-way policy, scored another win this month when the California state legislature gave the green light to a bill that would provide condoms for adult prison inmates. The plan, to furnish all the state’s prisons with condoms–likely through vending machines–was put forward despite the fact that it’s illegal in the Golden State to have sex behind bars. The bill, approved last week by the state’s assembly and senate, now heads to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, where it will await its fate.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

A “harm reduction” approach to public health, rather than an abstinence or look-the-other-way policy, scored another win this month when the California state legislature gave the green light to a bill that would provide condoms for adult prison inmates. The plan, to furnish all the state’s prisons with condoms–likely through vending machines–was put forward despite the fact that it’s illegal in the Golden State to have sex behind bars. The bill, approved last week by the state’s assembly and senate, now heads to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, where it will await its fate.

Monday, September 16, 2013

Efforts to combine the operations of struggling Alameda and San Leandro hospitals with the public Alameda Health System cleared what proponents called a critical hurdle on Friday when Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill that addresses workers’ pensions.

The bill, co-authored by Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, and Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, D-Alamo, eliminates the requirement that full-time workers from the two hospitals become eligible for a county pension when the deals close and they become employees of Alameda Health System. It also allows employees of the two community hospitals who work half time or more and are enrolled in pension plans now to maintain a pension benefit.

Friday, September 13, 2013

OAKLAND — As a City Council member here, Libby Schaaf is notified each time someone is shot. That, it turns out, occurs several times each day.

It is a relentless reminder of Oakland's sweeping public safety crisis: So far this year there have been 3,026 gun crimes in this city just shy of 400,000 residents, which tops the list of the state's most dangerous.